Civil War Reads

On this day, April 9th, 150 years ago… Robert E. Lee surrendered the Army of Northern Virginia to Ulysses S. Grant at Appomattox Courthouse in Virginia, effectively ending the Civil War.

How much do YOU know about the Civil War?

Scan our shelves and see what you can find…

A Stillness At Appomattox by Bruce Catton
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A recounting of the most spectacular conflicts between Generals Grant and Lee in the final year of the Civil War. When first published in 1953, Bruce Catton, our foremost Civil War historian was awarded both the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Award for excellence in nonfiction.  This final volume of The Army of the Potomac trilogy relates the final year of the Civil War.

 

April 1865 by Jay Winik
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April 1865 was a month that could have unraveled the nation. Instead, it saved it. Here Jay Winik offers a brilliant new look at the Civil War’s final days that will forever change the way we see the war’s end and the nation’s new beginning. Uniquely set within the larger sweep of history, filled with rich profiles of outsize figures, fresh iconoclastic scholarship, and a gripping narrative, this is a masterful account of the thirty most pivotal days in the life of the United States.

It was not inevitable that the Civil War would end as it did, or that it would end at all well. Indeed, it almost didn’t.

 

Forever Free: The Story of Emancipation and the Reconstruction by Eric Foner
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A necessary reconsideration that emphasizes the era’s political and cultural meaning for today’s America. In Forever Free, Eric Foner overturns numerous assumptions growing out of the traditional understanding of the period, which is based almost exclusively on white sources and shaped by (often unconscious) racism. He presents the period as a time of determination, especially on the part of recently emancipated black Americans, to put into effect the principles of equal rights and citizenship for all.

Drawing on a wide range of long-neglected documents, he places a new emphasis on the centrality of the black experience to an understanding of the era. We see African Americans as active agents in overthrowing slavery, in helping win the Civil War, and–even more actively–in shaping Reconstruction and creating a legacy long obscured and misunderstood.

 

Robert Lee on Leadership by H.W. Crocker
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Robert E. Lee was a leader for the ages. The man heralded by Winston Churchill as “one of the noblest Americans who ever lived” inspired an out-manned, out-gunned army to achieve greatness on the battlefield. He was a brilliant strategist and a man of unyielding courage who, in the face of insurmountable odds, nearly changed forever the course of history.

You’ll learn the keys to Lee’s greatness as a man and a leader. You’ll find a general whose standards for personal excellence was second to none, whose leadership was founded on the highest moral principles, and whose character was made of steel.

 

Grand and Sherman: The Friendship That Won The Civil War by Charles Bracelen Flood
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We were as brothers, William Tecumseh Sherman said, describing his relationship to Ulysses S. Grant. They were incontestably two of the most important figures in the Civil War, but until now there has been no book about their victorious partnership and the deep friendship that made it possible. They were prewar failures–Grant, forced to resign from the Regular Army because of his drinking, and Sherman, who held four different jobs, including a beloved position at a military academy in the South, during the four years before the Confederates fired on Fort Sumter. But heeding the call to save the Union each struggled past political hurdles to join the war effort. And taking each other’s measure at the Battle of Shiloh, ten months into the war, they began their unique collaboration. Often together under fire on the war’s great battlefields, they smoked cigars as they gave orders and learned from their mistakes as well as from their shrewd decisions.

They shared the demands of family life and the heartache of loss, including the tragic death of Shermans’s favorite son. They supported each other in the face of mudslinging criticism by the press and politicians. Their growing mutual admiration and trust, which President Lincoln increasingly relied upon, would set the stage for the crucial final year of the war. While Grant battled with Lee in the campaigns that ended at Appomattox Court House, Sherman first marched through Georgia to Atlanta, and then continued with his epic March to the Sea. Not only did Grant and Sherman come to think alike, but, even though their headquarters at that time were hundreds of miles apart, they were in virtually daily communication strategizing the finalmoves of the war and planning how to win the peace that would follow.

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